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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #3 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 21:38:34 »
Americans are quitting their jobs more, and that's a good thing

     WASHINGTON: In a paradoxically good development for the US economy, Americans quit their jobs in September at the fastest rate in over six years.
     Other data on Thursday showed the number of new jobless claims rose last week but remained near a 14-year low, and the two readings suggested the US labor market was moving toward full health.
     Two percent of US job-holders, or about 2.8 million workers, left their jobs under their own volition in September, the Labor Department said.
     That's important for two reasons.
    One, the quits rate fell during the 2007-09 recession and has been slower to recover than other labor market indicators because workers lacked confidence to leave their jobs for greener pastures. Some analysts believe this has helped keep wage gains stagnant even as the jobless rate has fallen because employers don't have to raise wages as much to retain talent when there is less employee turnover.
    Second, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has signaled the quits rate as an indicator she is following on her "dashboard" for assessing progress in the labor market's recovery.
    "It's definitely good for wages," said Joseph LaVorgna, chief US economist at Deutsche Bank. "Also, the chair of the Federal Reserve is looking at it, and if she's looking at it, we have to as well."
      The Fed last month gave an upbeat view of the jobs market, saying that labor market slack was "gradually diminishing."
    Thursday's data also showed the rate of hiring, which occupies another place on Yellen's dashboard, rose in September. The job openings rate, which has already returned to the levels seen just before the recession, fell.
     In a separate report, the Labor Department said initial claims for state unemployment benefits rose 12,000 to 290,000 for the week ended Nov. 8.
     That was a bigger increase than expected, but claims have now been below 300,000 for nine straight weeks, suggesting firms are well past a cycle of elevated layoffs that began in the recession.
      "This increase is nothing to worry about," said Ian Shepherdson, an economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. "Claims can remain close to their current trend for an extended period."
     Yields on US government debt were little changed following the publication of the two Labor Department reports.



http://economictimes.indiatimes.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #2 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 21:33:22 »

Police hunt for tiger loose near Disneyland Paris

     PARIS (AP) — French authorities say a young tiger is on the loose near Disneyland Paris, one of Europe's top tourist destinations, and have urged residents in three nearby towns to stay indoors.
     The town of Montevrain sent out a news alert on its Facebook page Thursday saying a young tiger was spotted in the brush behind tennis courts and a soccer field about 9 kilometers (5 1/2 miles) from Disneyland Paris.
     An examination of a muddy footprint showed the tiger weighs about 70 kilograms (154 pounds) and is about 1 ½ years old, said Clement Joly, a Montevrain spokesman.
     Police and rescue squads roped off a security perimeter and urged people living in Montevrain, Chessy and Chalifert to remain indoors. If they must travel, residents were told to stay inside their cars as around 60 police, fire and other security forces tried to track the tiger.
     Police were using a helicopter, a specially trained dog and a wolf-catcher to aid the search, authorities in Seine-et-Marne said.
To be safe, school children in Montevrain were accompanied home at the end of Thursday's classes, Joly said.
    Where the tiger came from is still a mystery.
The Parc des Felins, a wild cat animal park 29 kilometers (18 miles) from Montevrain, said all of its animals were accounted for. EuroDisney, the operator of Disneyland Paris, said it has no tigers in its theme park.
    Disneyland Paris calls itself Europe's No. 1 tourist destination with 14.2 million visits in 2013. Officials at the theme park said no special precautions were being taken Thursday inside the park due to the tiger.


www.usatoday.com

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Foreign press
« Ответ #1 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 20:04:03 »
Vladimir Putin’s newest enemy: Australia

     Australia will host the leaders of the Group of 20 nations at their annual meeting this weekend, with the world's major economies coming together in Brisbane for major talks. For one guest, however, there might not be a warm welcome.
             Over the past few weeks, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has repeatedly warned Russian President Vladimir Putin that he intended to take him to task for his government's alleged role in shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine in July. Pointing to widely accepted evidence that Kremlin-backed rebels shot down the plane, Abbott has argued that Russia should not just help more with the investigation but should also pay compensation to the victims.
            It's an emotional issue for many Australians – 38 of the passengers killed on the flight were citizens of the country – and one that the prime minister has seized on. Abbott, a conservative politician who has frequently caused controversy in Australia, went so far as to publicly threaten to "shirtfront" the Russian president – a colloquialism from Australian rules football that means to bump someone "forcefully in the chest."
           "I am going to be saying to Mr. Putin, 'Australians were murdered; they were murdered by Russian-backed rebels using Russian-supplied equipment,'" Abbott added – though he later walked back his comments, promising only a "robust" discussion with Putin.
           In the end, Abbott decided to bring forward his confrontation with Putin, challenging him for 15 minutes at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing on Tuesday. According to the Guardian, the Australian leader told his Russian counterpart that he had evidence that the missile launcher used to down the Malaysia Airlines plane had come from Russia and was returned to Russia afterward. Abbott pointed to the example set by the United States when it shot down Iran Air Flight 655 in 1988 and subsequently apologized and paid compensation to the victims' families.
          The response may not be what Abbott was hoping for, however. Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, joked to Russian reportersthat Abbott "did not even try" to "shirtfront" Putin, and on Wednesday, a representative of the Russian Embassy in Canberra flatly rejected the Australian position.
           "We totally refute the allegations and we want to commit to the full and impartial international investigation," spokesman Alexander Odoevskiytold the Sydney Morning Herald. "If the prime minister has, as he declares, any clear evidence, then he should bring it to the table. We haven't seen it." Odoevskiy also told the newspaper that the situation with Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was "incomparable" to Iran Air Flight 655 due to the lack of agreement over who was was behind the downing of the plane.
            To make matters worse, Australian media are also reporting that Russia may be flexing its military muscles near Australia. 7News reported Wednesday that "four Russian warships are bearing down on Australian waters, led by the guided missile Cruiser, Varyag, the flag ship of Russia's Pacific fleet." Australia's government has downplayed this development, pointing out that the "movements of these vessels [are] entirely consistent with provisions under international law." Any direct military confrontation between the two nations certainly appears extremely unlikely, though the movement of the ships draws an interesting parallel with a number of "unusual" recent incidents involving Russian air power in Europe.
           It leaves Abbott in an awkward position. For all his tough talk, an apology from Russia seems as distant as ever, and his macho "shirtfront" comment has been widely mocked; one online survey published by the paper Sydney Morning Herald found that the majority of readers were unhappy with his efforts. And while Putin may receive a cold reception in Brisbane, he's probably sure he has come out on top.