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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #11 : 27 Ноябрь 2014, 15:40:27 »
Russians: Ferguson Protests Threaten American Stability

The Russian Foreign Ministry’s human rights envoy Konstantin Dolgov said protests in Ferguson challenge American “stability.”

“The developments in Ferguson and other cities highlight serious challenges to the American society and its stability,” Dolgov said Tuesday in a Russian state television address.

“Racial discrimination, racial and ethnic tensions are major challenges to the American democracy, to stability and integrity of the American society,” Dolgov said. “We may only hope that U.S. authorities seriously deal with those issues and other serious challenges in the human rights field in their own country and stop what they have been doing all along recently — playing an aggressive mentor lecturing other countries about how to meet human rights standards.”

President Barack Obama said in a speech Tuesday night in Chicago that he supports the Ferguson protesters and urged them to “mobilize, organize.”

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #10 : 25 Ноябрь 2014, 10:20:48 »
America’s Dangerous Double Standard on Air and Sea “Provocations”

The United States and its NATO allies are mightily agitated about the increase in Russian air and naval activity near the Baltic republics. According to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, alliance warplanes have scrambled 400 times in 2014 in response to Russian military flights, an increase of 50 percent over 2013. Western officials repeatedly denounce Moscow’s maneuvers as dangerous and provocative.

Statements by U.S. and NATO leaders, along with Western media accounts, foster the impression that Russian ships and aircraft arrogantly penetrate the airspace and territorial waters of alliance members. But when pressed, officials concede that the vast majority of incidents do not involve such illegality. Stoltenberg stated that most of the flights “are close to NATO airspace,” but he admitted that there were “a very limited number of violations.”

Reading the fine print of other Western complaints reveals similarly misleading imagery. Baltic leaders express anger that a Russian warship entered Latvia’s exclusive economic zone, but it turns out that the location was still some nine nautical miles outside the country’s territorial waters. Latvia’s Ministry of Defense fumed that Russian warships had “approached” Latvian waters some fifty times in 2014 and had “come close” to Latvian airspace some 200 times. Yet the Ministry did not cite verifiable violations of its territorial waters or airspace.

The actual substance of other episodes likewise seems far less dramatic than the scare headlines that have become routine in the Western press. NATO F-16 jets intercepted a Russian Ilyushin transport plane over the Baltic Sea on November 12, after it “approached” Estonian and Lithuanian airspace. Similar incidents took place between NATO aircraft and Russian Su-27 fighter planes on November 15 and 17. Again, the Russian offense was that its aircraft were found “near Latvia’s territorial seas” in the former case and had “approached Estonian and Lithuanian airspace” in the latter. Despite such complaints, the encounters indisputably took place over international waters, Western governments acknowledged.

Calling the Russian actions provocative has some merit. Nations understandably become jittery when foreign ships and aircraft operate near their territory. That nervousness mounts when the foreign power has tense relations with one’s own country, and that is certainly the case, given the deterioration of relations between Russia and the NATO states in response to the Ukraine crisis. Adding to the tension is that Russian military planes are operating without activating their transponders, thereby increasing the hazard to commercial air traffic.

But one might at least expect the United States and its allies to be consistent about their attitude toward provocative air and naval maneuvers. Instead, the United States has adopted a blatant double standard when it comes to the actions of its own armed forces. China, for example, has asked that U.S. (as well as Japanese and South Korean) military aircraft respect Beijing’s air defense identification zone in the East China Sea and provide timely information about flights entering that area. Washington and its allies not only refuse to do so, they refuse even to recognize the legitimacy of that zone. Yet such resistance is not considered to be provocative or creating a threat to aircraft safety.

In addition, the United States routinely operates reconnaissance flights barely outside China’s territorial airspace, including near a major Chinese submarine base on Hainan Island. Those flights, and China’s dispatch of fighter planes to intercept them, have led to a number of nasty incidents, including a near collision earlier this year and an actual collision in 2001. Yet Washington has brushed off Beijing’s complaints, noting that the reconnaissance planes are operating in international airspace. Indeed, U.S. officials chastise China for trying to intercept and harass the spy flights.

All parties need to adopt a more prudent approach and recognize that what may be legitimate under international law is not necessarily wise. The United States has a legal right to send its spy planes near the Chinese coast to monitor sensitive Chinese military installations. And Russia has every legal right to operate military ships and planes in areas close to the boundaries of NATO member states. But such actions by both countries are also provocative and dangerous. As the 2001 U.S. incident with China confirmed, the risk of an accident or miscalculation is unacceptably high. That episode created a major crisis between Washington and Beijing. An incident involving Russian and NATO planes in the Baltic region could easily escalate, leading to a frightening military confrontation between the West and Moscow.

One would hope that all relevant governments would step back and seek ways to reduce the level of risk. In addition, the United States needs to examine its own actions before it smugly denounces those of rival powers. As matters now stand, Washington is guilty of hypocrisy, as well as provocative behavior regarding air and naval maneuvers.

Source: http://nationalinterest.org/feature/america%E2%80%99s-dangerous-double-standard-air-sea-provocations%E2%80%9D-11721

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #9 : 22 Ноябрь 2014, 13:47:48 »
McFaul: "Ukrainians are disappointed with the results of the revolution"


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt7v2ikrW60" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt7v2ikrW60</a>

www.msnbc.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #8 : 20 Ноябрь 2014, 22:31:53 »
RUSSIAN HACKERS REPORTEDLY SPYING ON UK FAMILIES


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyXhGVrb1ao" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyXhGVrb1ao</a>

Sky News

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #7 : 20 Ноябрь 2014, 22:18:00 »
Ukraine’s Slow Collapse


The crisis in Ukraine has reached an impasse. The cease-fire signed in Minsk, Belarus, in September never really took hold, but at least it provided a cover for efforts to reduce the level of fighting and focus on stabilizing and reforming the Ukrainian economy as a prelude to a serious, long-term search for a resolution of the crisis. Now even the fig leaf of cease-fire is gone. Russian armored vehicles are rolling into eastern Ukraine — disowned, of course, by Moscow.

Gunfire is exchanged constantly in and around Donetsk, and Kiev has basically disowned residents of territories claimed by separatists by cutting most government services, benefits and pensions. And though elections to the Ukrainian Parliament on Oct. 26 brought in a new, pro-Western legislature, Kiev is still far from forming a government or producing a viable program of reforms.

The United States and the European Union have made clear, and correctly so, that they hold President Vladimir Putin of Russia largely responsible for this state of affairs. He was snubbed at the Group of 20 meeting in Brisbane, Australia. Then Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, once the European leader deemed most cautious in relations with Moscow, assailed him for reviving a Cold War atmosphere 25 years after the Berlin Wall fell.

There is no question that by annexing Crimea and arming separatists in eastern Ukraine, Mr. Putin has done great damage to East-West relations — and to his country, which finds itself isolated and in economic trouble. The decision on Monday by the European Union to add more separatist leaders to the list of Mr. Putin’s allies barred from Europe may be largely symbolic, but along with the cold reception in Brisbane, it does let the Russian leader know that the West is not about to let him off the hook.

That said, it is important to acknowledge that officials in Kiev, and more specifically President Petro Poroshenko and Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk, have responsibilities they must live up to. Ukraine has been plagued by corruption since it became independent, and the current crisis has made it even more imperative for the leaders to form a government and come up with a credible economic and political strategy.

The Ukrainian economy is in terrible shape — the currency has lost almost half its value against the dollar in 2014, the industrial centers of Donetsk and Luhansk are in separatist hands, coal mines have shut down. The International Monetary Fund has provided emergency aid, but the hard fact is that the European Union and the United States cannot be expected to make substantial commitments until Ukraine provides a clear reform plan and priorities for outside investment. Johannes Hahn, the new European Union commissioner for enlargement, is right to insist that the union will not hold a donors’ conference without this.

In addition to an economic strategy, Kiev needs to prepare a plan for loosening central control in a way that might satisfy residents of the eastern provinces. The decision by President Poroshenko to cut government benefits and pensions to residents of areas under the control of Kremlin-backed separatists, though understandable in the circumstances, has left those unable to flee feeling betrayed by Kiev, creating a vacuum for Moscow to fill.

There is no question that ordering painful reforms when a country is already on its knees is asking a lot. That is why it is imperative that Western leaders make clear that they will give Kiev substantial assistance only after it embarks on a serious program of economic and political reform. After all, that was what the Ukrainians who took to the streets in December 2013 fought for.


www.nytimes.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #6 : 20 Ноябрь 2014, 11:41:22 »
Meeting U.S. Envoy, Putin Appears to Soften His Tone


MOSCOW — President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia said Wednesday that Moscow and Washington could find avenues of practical cooperation if the partnership were based on “mutual respect and pragmatism.”

It may have seemed a frosty reception for John F. Tefft, the new American ambassador to Russia, who presented his credentials at a ceremony in the gilded St. Alexander Hall in the Kremlin, but given Mr. Putin’s more bellicose statements of late, the president’s remarks seemed almost diplomatic.

“We are ready for practical cooperation with our American partners in all different areas, based on the principles of respect for each other’s interests, equality and nonintervention in domestic affairs,” Mr. Putin said, as he addressed Mr. Tefft and 14 other diplomats who presented their credentials during the ceremony.

“We take the view that Russia and the United States bear special responsibility for maintaining international security and stability and combating global threats and challenges,” he said.

Mr. Tefft, a career diplomat who has served as ambassador to Ukraine, Georgia and Lithuania, has kept a low profile since arriving in Moscow in September, as relations between the United States and Russia have descended to their worst state since the Cold War.

Mr. Putin has blamed the West for setting off the conflict in Ukraine and told political supporters on Monday that the United States sought to “subjugate” Russia.

On Tuesday, at an exhibition of armored personnel carriers, Mr. Putin observed that “you can do a lot more with weapons and politeness than just politeness,” a reference to the “polite” Russian soldiers who appeared in Crimea in early March.

The United States and the European Union have leveled punishing sanctions against Russia in response to its annexation of Crimea and subsequent sponsorship of separatists in a proxy war in southeastern Ukraine. At last week’s meeting of the Group of 20, Mr. Obama claimed the sanctions were working, and foreign leaders vied to get in a good barb against Mr. Putin.

“I guess I’ll shake your hand,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada told Mr. Putin at the summit meeting. “But you need to get out of Ukraine.”

Mr. Tefft’s mission is straightforward, said Matthew Rojansky, a Russia expert at the Wilson Center: Maintain an open line between Moscow and Washington.

“He is sent to do the classic, core job of an ambassador, to be a truly trusted channel of communications between the political leadership, as opposed to being sent as a statement of some kind,” Mr. Rojansky said in a telephone interview.

Mr. Tefft’s predecessor, Michael McFaul, left Moscow in February after a stormy two-year term in which he aimed to engage with ordinary Russians through public events and social media, but he was hounded by the state news media and accused of being sent to foment revolution.

In a statement on Wednesday, Mr. Tefft said it was “a privilege” to attend Wednesday’s ceremony, during which he shared a few words with Mr. Putin and posed quickly for a photo.

“We have serious differences over Russia’s policy in Ukraine,” Mr. Tefft said, adding that he hoped to improve “people-to-people ties.”

“I will do my best to engage Russians from all parts of society,” he said. “I will explain what the United States stands for and promote respect for the dignity of every citizen, democratic values, good governance, and rule of law.”

http://www.nytimes.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #5 : 14 Ноябрь 2014, 13:33:50 »
Putin Berates US Over Sanctions Before G20 Meeting

MOSCOW—President Vladimir Putin accused the United States on Friday of undermining the very trade institutions it created by imposing sanctions on Russia, a “mistake” he hoped would be overcome in the “final count.”

In an interview with Russian state news agency TASS before a meeting of the G20 major and developing economies, Putin said sanctions imposed by the United States and European Union on Russia over Ukraine harmed Russia, but also the global economy.

The Russian leader said the asset freezes, visa bans and measures preventing Russian companies accessing Western financial markets and technology went against international law because only the United Nations had the right to impose them.

They also went against trade agreements, including the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which the United States created, he said.

“The United States itself created that organization at a certain point. Now it is crudely violating its principles,” he said. “I do hope... that in the final count the awareness of this will prevail and bygones will be bygones.”

Putin said he would not bring up sanctions at the G20 meeting, which starts on Saturday in Australia, as “it'll make no sense.”

The Russian leader was not asked about Ukraine, a topic that may take center stage at talks in Brisbane following reports of Russian troops pouring into the country's east, where Kyiv has fought a separatist uprising.

Ukraine accuses Russia of sending soldiers and weapons to help rebels launch a new offensive in a conflict that has killed more than 4,000 people. Russia denies the charges.

Putin admitted the sanctions, imposed to try to change Russian policy in Ukraine, and falling oil prices were taking their toll on the economy, but added: “Our reserves are big enough and they allow us to be sure that we will meet our social commitments.”

He also said Russia was turning eastwards towards China, a move spearheaded by state-controlled energy producer Rosneft , which has asked the government for more than 2 trillion rubles in financial support.

Putin said any decision on giving Rosneft money from the National Welfare Fund, created to protect the pension system, would be taken after a thorough analysis of the needs of a company “we truly treasure.”

“This will be a real assessment and I don't rule out that Rosneft may get some funds,” he said.

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #4 : 14 Ноябрь 2014, 10:34:48 »
Russian bomb patrols over Gulf would be "very significant"

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkxAn43Pp7A" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkxAn43Pp7A</a>

www.cbsnews.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #3 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 21:38:34 »
Americans are quitting their jobs more, and that's a good thing

     WASHINGTON: In a paradoxically good development for the US economy, Americans quit their jobs in September at the fastest rate in over six years.
     Other data on Thursday showed the number of new jobless claims rose last week but remained near a 14-year low, and the two readings suggested the US labor market was moving toward full health.
     Two percent of US job-holders, or about 2.8 million workers, left their jobs under their own volition in September, the Labor Department said.
     That's important for two reasons.
    One, the quits rate fell during the 2007-09 recession and has been slower to recover than other labor market indicators because workers lacked confidence to leave their jobs for greener pastures. Some analysts believe this has helped keep wage gains stagnant even as the jobless rate has fallen because employers don't have to raise wages as much to retain talent when there is less employee turnover.
    Second, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has signaled the quits rate as an indicator she is following on her "dashboard" for assessing progress in the labor market's recovery.
    "It's definitely good for wages," said Joseph LaVorgna, chief US economist at Deutsche Bank. "Also, the chair of the Federal Reserve is looking at it, and if she's looking at it, we have to as well."
      The Fed last month gave an upbeat view of the jobs market, saying that labor market slack was "gradually diminishing."
    Thursday's data also showed the rate of hiring, which occupies another place on Yellen's dashboard, rose in September. The job openings rate, which has already returned to the levels seen just before the recession, fell.
     In a separate report, the Labor Department said initial claims for state unemployment benefits rose 12,000 to 290,000 for the week ended Nov. 8.
     That was a bigger increase than expected, but claims have now been below 300,000 for nine straight weeks, suggesting firms are well past a cycle of elevated layoffs that began in the recession.
      "This increase is nothing to worry about," said Ian Shepherdson, an economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. "Claims can remain close to their current trend for an extended period."
     Yields on US government debt were little changed following the publication of the two Labor Department reports.



http://economictimes.indiatimes.com

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Re: Foreign press
« Ответ #2 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 21:33:22 »

Police hunt for tiger loose near Disneyland Paris

     PARIS (AP) — French authorities say a young tiger is on the loose near Disneyland Paris, one of Europe's top tourist destinations, and have urged residents in three nearby towns to stay indoors.
     The town of Montevrain sent out a news alert on its Facebook page Thursday saying a young tiger was spotted in the brush behind tennis courts and a soccer field about 9 kilometers (5 1/2 miles) from Disneyland Paris.
     An examination of a muddy footprint showed the tiger weighs about 70 kilograms (154 pounds) and is about 1 ½ years old, said Clement Joly, a Montevrain spokesman.
     Police and rescue squads roped off a security perimeter and urged people living in Montevrain, Chessy and Chalifert to remain indoors. If they must travel, residents were told to stay inside their cars as around 60 police, fire and other security forces tried to track the tiger.
     Police were using a helicopter, a specially trained dog and a wolf-catcher to aid the search, authorities in Seine-et-Marne said.
To be safe, school children in Montevrain were accompanied home at the end of Thursday's classes, Joly said.
    Where the tiger came from is still a mystery.
The Parc des Felins, a wild cat animal park 29 kilometers (18 miles) from Montevrain, said all of its animals were accounted for. EuroDisney, the operator of Disneyland Paris, said it has no tigers in its theme park.
    Disneyland Paris calls itself Europe's No. 1 tourist destination with 14.2 million visits in 2013. Officials at the theme park said no special precautions were being taken Thursday inside the park due to the tiger.


www.usatoday.com

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Foreign press
« Ответ #1 : 13 Ноябрь 2014, 20:04:03 »
Vladimir Putin’s newest enemy: Australia

     Australia will host the leaders of the Group of 20 nations at their annual meeting this weekend, with the world's major economies coming together in Brisbane for major talks. For one guest, however, there might not be a warm welcome.
             Over the past few weeks, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has repeatedly warned Russian President Vladimir Putin that he intended to take him to task for his government's alleged role in shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine in July. Pointing to widely accepted evidence that Kremlin-backed rebels shot down the plane, Abbott has argued that Russia should not just help more with the investigation but should also pay compensation to the victims.
            It's an emotional issue for many Australians – 38 of the passengers killed on the flight were citizens of the country – and one that the prime minister has seized on. Abbott, a conservative politician who has frequently caused controversy in Australia, went so far as to publicly threaten to "shirtfront" the Russian president – a colloquialism from Australian rules football that means to bump someone "forcefully in the chest."
           "I am going to be saying to Mr. Putin, 'Australians were murdered; they were murdered by Russian-backed rebels using Russian-supplied equipment,'" Abbott added – though he later walked back his comments, promising only a "robust" discussion with Putin.
           In the end, Abbott decided to bring forward his confrontation with Putin, challenging him for 15 minutes at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing on Tuesday. According to the Guardian, the Australian leader told his Russian counterpart that he had evidence that the missile launcher used to down the Malaysia Airlines plane had come from Russia and was returned to Russia afterward. Abbott pointed to the example set by the United States when it shot down Iran Air Flight 655 in 1988 and subsequently apologized and paid compensation to the victims' families.
          The response may not be what Abbott was hoping for, however. Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, joked to Russian reportersthat Abbott "did not even try" to "shirtfront" Putin, and on Wednesday, a representative of the Russian Embassy in Canberra flatly rejected the Australian position.
           "We totally refute the allegations and we want to commit to the full and impartial international investigation," spokesman Alexander Odoevskiytold the Sydney Morning Herald. "If the prime minister has, as he declares, any clear evidence, then he should bring it to the table. We haven't seen it." Odoevskiy also told the newspaper that the situation with Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was "incomparable" to Iran Air Flight 655 due to the lack of agreement over who was was behind the downing of the plane.
            To make matters worse, Australian media are also reporting that Russia may be flexing its military muscles near Australia. 7News reported Wednesday that "four Russian warships are bearing down on Australian waters, led by the guided missile Cruiser, Varyag, the flag ship of Russia's Pacific fleet." Australia's government has downplayed this development, pointing out that the "movements of these vessels [are] entirely consistent with provisions under international law." Any direct military confrontation between the two nations certainly appears extremely unlikely, though the movement of the ships draws an interesting parallel with a number of "unusual" recent incidents involving Russian air power in Europe.
           It leaves Abbott in an awkward position. For all his tough talk, an apology from Russia seems as distant as ever, and his macho "shirtfront" comment has been widely mocked; one online survey published by the paper Sydney Morning Herald found that the majority of readers were unhappy with his efforts. And while Putin may receive a cold reception in Brisbane, he's probably sure he has come out on top.